"falls over molokai", by brad schelton

"falls over molokai", by brad schelton

He spoke of human solitude, about the intrinsic loneliness of a sophisticated mind, one that is capable of reason and poetry but which grasps at straws when it comes to understanding another, a mind aware of the impossibility of absolute understanding. The difficulty of having a mind that understands that it will always be misunderstood.

Nicole Krauss
"there’s light even in the darkest places", by wordboner

"there’s light even in the darkest places", by wordboner

Then I give you nothing. I keep the millions of me that make me, me. I keep my moments without thought of you because to think of you makes you strong (and I will make you weak). I keep and declare my right to give you nothing. Nothing. Nothing.

"a shot in the dark", by wendy liu

dawnawakened:

Lowell Birge Harrison, Fifth Avenue at Twilight (c. 1910)
"Lowell Birge Harrison merged his Beaux-Arts academic training with American Transcendentalist sensibilities. He combined a technical finesse with a subjective feeling for the spiritual essence of landscape that made his art and teaching (his textbook on landscape painting was a bestseller in its day) central to the Tonalist movement. Harrison championed what he called “the big vision—the power to see and to render the whole of a given scene or picture motive, rather than to paint a still-life picture of its component parts; the power to give the essential and to suppress the inessential, the power to paint the atmosphere which surrounds the objects rather than the objects themselves….” Like James Abbott McNeill Whistler and George Inness, Harrison sought to express the power of place to move the observer." - Artsy

dawnawakened:

Lowell Birge Harrison, Fifth Avenue at Twilight (c. 1910)

"Lowell Birge Harrison merged his Beaux-Arts academic training with American Transcendentalist sensibilities. He combined a technical finesse with a subjective feeling for the spiritual essence of landscape that made his art and teaching (his textbook on landscape painting was a bestseller in its day) central to the Tonalist movement. Harrison championed what he called “the big vision—the power to see and to render the whole of a given scene or picture motive, rather than to paint a still-life picture of its component parts; the power to give the essential and to suppress the inessential, the power to paint the atmosphere which surrounds the objects rather than the objects themselves….” Like James Abbott McNeill Whistler and George Inness, Harrison sought to express the power of place to move the observer." - Artsy

(via smutmouth)

But Paris was a very old city and we were young and nothing was simple there, not even poverty, nor sudden money, nor the moonlight, nor right and wrong, nor the breathing of someone who lay beside you in the moonlight.

Ernest Hemingway